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Water Purification Sachets to Aid Developing Countries

pur Water Purification Sachets to Aid Developing CountriesWith the aim to provide developing countries a cheap and easy way to purify water, Procter and Gamble (P&G), a giant multinational consumers good company, has developed a small water purification system packed in small sachets called ‘Pur’. Each sachet can purify 10 liters of brown, murky water into clear and drinkable water, enough for five people in one day.

How to use each sachet was designed to be very easy. One will only need just any cotton cloth and container, be they dirty or clean. Pour the contents of the sachet into the impure water, stir, and let the sediments to aggregate and settle at the bottom for about 20 minutes. Then, decant and filter the resulting clear water through the cotton cloth, which sifts out the sediments from the clear water.

How does Pur work? Each sachet contains  iron sulfate that coagulates the sediments and chlorine which kills the bacteria.

In a joint effort with humanitarian groups such as Save the Children, World Vision, and Care, P&G reaches out to developing nations and disaster areas in their non-profit programme to distribute Pur and teach them the proper usage of the water purification sachet.

How much will it cost P&G? Shipping, distribution and duties, education and training on site amount to about 10 US cents per sachet.  Their goal is to distribute 200 million sachets each year by 2020, tantamount to two billion liters of drinkable water. So far, they are to produce 100 million sachets in their Pakistan plant and 40 million in Singapore plant.

It’s always good to hear large companies or people to set aside their personal interests and truly help out unfortunate people that are on the extreme opposite end. After all, what good are technologies if they can’t be shared with everyone?


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About the author

Janina is a chemical engineer and materials scientist who has worked as research associate and learned various laboratory techniques in biological microscopy and materials characterization. She thinks it is time to start pursuing global and humanitarian goals, little by little, and The Green Optimistic has given her the first little step, that is, through writing.

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