Home > Transportation > Car industry >

Light Hybrid Vehicles May be The Next Best Thing

stop start 300x144 Light Hybrid Vehicles May be The Next Best Thing

Start-Stop Technology [SST] Could be the Next Logical Step in Helping Consumers to Adopt Hybrid Vehicles

To reduce emissions and increase fuel economy, hybrid vehicles are a pretty good option that aren’t nearly as expensive as pure electric vehicles.

In the hierarchy of vehicle pricing, though, it can be difficult sometimes to justify spending more up front for better technology, even if it’ll save you money at the pump. Given a choice over a conventional vehicle, you could go for hybrid vehicle and pay a few thousand more, or go for an electric vehicle and pay many thousands more. On the other hand, you could go electric vehicle for only a few thousand more, but you’d sacrifice a lot in range and power next to a comparable hybrid vehicle.

Micro- or Light-Hybrid vehicles, also known as Start-Stop Technology [SST] could be the next best thing. One of the selling points of hybrid vehicles is that they don’t run the engine at a stop, which is a waste of fuel when you aren’t going anywhere. The problem with most hybrid vehicles is price, since the electric motors and battery packs tend to cost up to $10,000. SST light-hybrid vehicles are a little bit different, but they could save thousands compared to a typical hybrid.

First of all, because the battery on an SST light-hybrid vehicle is smaller, just 60V and a couple kWh capacity, it isn’t nearly as expensive, just $500 in some cases. Operation is seamless, shutting down the engine when decelerating and coming to a stop, then restarting the engine when you let off the brake. While the engine is stopped, the battery supplies power needed to run air conditioning, radio, lights, etc.

Johnson Controls’ MaryAnn Wright, vice president of technology and innovation, says that SST is the next logical step to expand the adoption of hybrid vehicle technology. Depending on who you talk to, SST light-hybrid vehicle advocates say drivers can realize a 5%-20% boost in fuel economy, without sacrificing performance, range, or your wallet.


Share it


Like our Facebook page

About the author

Ben has been a Master Automobile Technician for over ten years, certified by ASE, Toyota, and Lexus. He specialized in electronic systems and hybrid technology. Branching out now, as a Professional Freelance Writer, he specializes in research and writing about his main area of interest, Automotive Technology, Alternative Fuels, and Concept Vehicles.

Comments

0 comments
Tweet