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High Efficiency/Low Temperature Geothermal System Implemented in Utah

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Geothermal energy is considered to be the ultimate energy source in terms of reliability. Since it doesn’t depend on day or night, or other external factor, it is practically undisturbable and has a huge potential. The US already has the world’s greatest geothermal energy usage, but the production points are limited to a few areas with very hot water, thus reducing its practical advantage over other energy sources and renders only 1% of the total energy production.

A company based in California, though, has found a solution to this issue and invented a geothermal extractor that doesn’t need the water to be very hot, but rather warm. The system works this way: the water enters the pipes and heats a low temperature boiling oil. This one is creating steam, that drives a turbine, creating electricity. The water is not wasted afterwards, but re-injected into the ground.

Watch AOANews’ video below, and get a picture of this new and exciting technology:

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2 COMMENTS

  1. Raser Industries is headquartered in Utah, not California. It did not invent the organic rankine cycle engine that has been around for a very long time.

    United Technologies improved the performance of the organic rankine cycle engine to generate electricity at record-setting low temperatures.

    Raser Industries rather connected United Technologies’ units in modular fashion. That innovation promises to revolutionize the industry and deserves the plaudits awarded.

    The geothermal power industry has long suffered from misinformation. One of the first countries to utilize innovative low temperature technology to generate power from its geothermal resources was Iceland. Iceland added heat to warm geothermal brines in the remote village of Husavik and built the first kalina cycle power plant, that has now been duplicated by Germany.

    Geothermal power has never relied on superheated water in geologic hotspots as often claimed.

    Thank you for the article.

    Best, Terry

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