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DIY: How To Make an Ice-Powered Air Conditioner in 3 Easy Steps

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frontIt is a well-known fact that people from the Western part of Europe tend to complain about the weather slightly more than others. But as the long anticipated summer finally arrived to most parts of the continent, the use of air-conditioning systems increased exponentially.

Of course, if you are lucky enough to have a fancy technology that is extremely energy efficient and at the same time provides the needed chill, then there is not much you should worry about. But for all of us, who are slightly less fortunate and are stuck in an office or an apartment with a small fan,  here is a brilliant idea for making your own air conditioning system in three simple steps and a fraction of the cost.

Brilliant ideas are always recycled and spread, so before we follow the tutorial, credit should of course be given to the Instructables user Ehensel1, who shared the master invention of Geoff Milburn.

1. Fit the heat exchanger

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If you want to achieve a good look for your air-conditioner-to-be, you might want to consider using a grate from a fan, which will contain the heat exchanger. The best heat eschanger to use is copper tubing. It is a little more expensive than other tubings and more difficult to work with, but it is definitely the best value for money. Be careful not to kink the tubing, because this might stop the flow of water.

Wrap the tubing around using a hole saw and zip ties in order to hold the teeth against the grate. Do not forget to clip all loose ends, and leave the two ends of the tubing out of the fan.

 

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2.  Attach the pump

The right size for a pump is 1/4″, but if you happen to buy a 1/2″, then you might have to adjust the size of the tubing before fitting it onto the pump. However, by resizing, it is possible to experience some leakage of water later on, which might consequently reduce the efficiency. A bigger pump will definitely allow faster flow of water, maximizing the cooling effect.

 

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3. Submerge the pump

Fill a container with a coolant (ice water should do the job). One tube should go from the pump to the heat exchanger, while another should link the heat exchanger with the cooler. If there are any leaks, you will be able to see them as soon as you plug the pump. Make sure you switch it off before making any needed adjustments.

Enjoy!

 

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