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Moixa's Smart DC Network Powers Small Devices to Save Money on Electricity

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If you didn’t know, there was actually a war when electricity was to be made publicly accessible through a grid. Nikola Tesla and Thomas Edison each disputed his own way of delivering the electricity: through alternative current (AC) and, respectively, through direct current.

One can talk for hours about the advantages and disadvantages of one and the other, but what’s sure is that we nowadays have Tesla’s system implemented from the electricity generator to our wall socket, and an AC to DC transformer for most of the home’s small consumers (laptops, phones, etc).

This AC to DC transformation is usually very inefficient, which translates into wasted money and energy. A London-based company named Moixa Technology, has estimated that more than one trillion kilowatt-hours of global energy is wasted due to those inefficiencies.

As a response to this need, the company unveiled their Smart DC network in London, at INNOVATE 11. Their system consists of solar panels, batteries and a hub that communicates with a smart meter to manage the electricity flow, predicting the energy use patterns for a certain home, how much electricity is stored in the home’s batteries and many more.

Since Moixa’s system uses sunlight as one of its sources of energy, it can even make predictions of energy production based on the weather forecast.

The Smart DC network is designed to be used for low-power DC devices, because this is area where it does its best. If Moixa’s estimate is right, about 40 percent of a home’s electricity goes towards powering such devices.

The company also says that the system will pay for itself ($4,700) in three to five years, depending on the type of consumption in the customer’s home. It’s also cheaper than a large-sized solar installation, hence more affordable.

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