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DIYer Retrofits 1983 Mustang to Run on Water (Read: Hydrogen)

The Doc's "Fuel Cell"
The Doc’s “Fuel Cell”

Since the beginning of time, there have always been Do-It-Yourself-ers, and sometimes all it takes is a great idea from a backyard inventor to make a great thing even better. Alternative fuels are no different, and some of the ideas on alternative fuels have come from such backyard labs. Case in point, Chris “The Doc” Ingrassia’s 1983 Ford Mustang. By itself, the V6 Mustang is nothing special but, with the addition of some DIY know-how, it could be.

True, most of the documentation is on YouTube, as The Doc is host of the Operation Mustang channel, and there isn’t any actual proof, so we need to take this will a little bit of salt. Now, in the video, he refers to this as a “fuel cell” but let’s not mix terms up here.

A Hydrogen Fuel Cell [HFC] combines hydrogen and atmospheric oxygen into water, generating electricity in the process. What The Doc has created is an Electrolytic Cell [EC], which is the reverse process of an HFC, using electricity to split water into component gases, hydrogen and oxygen, and burn them outright.

Hydrogen is a great fuel, and while the EC doesn’t generate enough of it to run the engine on its own, The Doc claims a 20% increase in fuel efficiency by feeding into the carburetor of a 1983 Ford Mustang V6. Search for “hydrogen fuel cell” on YouTube and you’ll find hundreds of DIY plans on how to build one for your vehicle and “save gas.” The theory is sound, and if the results are real, 20% as The Doc claims, then why aren’t we seeing this simple add-on system being produced by any of the major manufacturers?

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About the author

Ben has been a Master Automobile Technician for over ten years, certified by ASE, Toyota, and Lexus. He specialized in electronic systems and hybrid technology. Branching out now, as a Professional Freelance Writer, he specializes in research and writing about his main area of interest, Automotive Technology, Alternative Fuels, and Concept Vehicles.

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